Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers

Research output: Journal contributionsScientific review articlesResearch

Standard

Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers. / Koutinas, Apostolis A.; Vlysidis, Anestis; Pleissner, Daniel et al.

In: Chemical Society Reviews, Vol. 43, No. 8, 21.04.2014, p. 2587-2627.

Research output: Journal contributionsScientific review articlesResearch

Harvard

Koutinas, AA, Vlysidis, A, Pleissner, D, Kopsahelis, N, Lopez Garcia, I, Kookos, IK, Papanikolaou, S, Kwan, TH & Lin, CSK 2014, 'Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers', Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 2587-2627. https://doi.org/10.1039/c3cs60293a

APA

Koutinas, A. A., Vlysidis, A., Pleissner, D., Kopsahelis, N., Lopez Garcia, I., Kookos, I. K., Papanikolaou, S., Kwan, T. H., & Lin, C. S. K. (2014). Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers. Chemical Society Reviews, 43(8), 2587-2627. https://doi.org/10.1039/c3cs60293a

Vancouver

Koutinas AA, Vlysidis A, Pleissner D, Kopsahelis N, Lopez Garcia I, Kookos IK et al. Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers. Chemical Society Reviews. 2014 Apr 21;43(8):2587-2627. doi: 10.1039/c3cs60293a

Bibtex

@article{f082b77c6fc142a2af5b973e9b965e20,
title = "Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers",
abstract = "The transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to a bio-based economy necessitates the exploitation of synergies, scientific innovations and breakthroughs, and step changes in the infrastructure of chemical industry. Sustainable production of chemicals and biopolymers should be dependent entirely on renewable carbon. White biotechnology could provide the necessary tools for the evolution of microbial bioconversion into a key unit operation in future biorefineries. Waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors (e.g., food industry, pulp and paper industry, biodiesel and bioethanol production) could be used as renewable resources for both biorefinery development and production of nutrient-complete fermentation feedstocks. This review focuses on the potential of utilizing waste and by-product streams from current industrial activities for the production of chemicals and biopolymers via microbial bioconversion. The first part of this review presents the current status and prospects on fermentative production of important platform chemicals (i.e., selected C2–C6 metabolic products and single cell oil) and biopolymers (i.e., polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacterial cellulose). In the second part, the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors are presented. In the third part, the techno-economic aspects of bioconversion processes are critically reviewed. Four case studies showing the potential of case-specific waste and by-product streams for the production of succinic acid and polyhydroxyalkanoates are presented. It is evident that fermentative production of chemicals and biopolymers via refining of waste and by-product streams is a highly important research area with significant prospects for industrial applications.",
keywords = "Chemistry",
author = "Koutinas, {Apostolis A.} and Anestis Vlysidis and Daniel Pleissner and Nikolaos Kopsahelis and {Lopez Garcia}, Isabel and Kookos, {Ioannis K.} and Seraphim Papanikolaou and Kwan, {Tsz Him} and Lin, {Carol Sze Ki}",
year = "2014",
month = apr,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1039/c3cs60293a",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "2587--2627",
journal = "Chemical Society Reviews",
issn = "0306-0012",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers

AU - Koutinas, Apostolis A.

AU - Vlysidis, Anestis

AU - Pleissner, Daniel

AU - Kopsahelis, Nikolaos

AU - Lopez Garcia, Isabel

AU - Kookos, Ioannis K.

AU - Papanikolaou, Seraphim

AU - Kwan, Tsz Him

AU - Lin, Carol Sze Ki

PY - 2014/4/21

Y1 - 2014/4/21

N2 - The transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to a bio-based economy necessitates the exploitation of synergies, scientific innovations and breakthroughs, and step changes in the infrastructure of chemical industry. Sustainable production of chemicals and biopolymers should be dependent entirely on renewable carbon. White biotechnology could provide the necessary tools for the evolution of microbial bioconversion into a key unit operation in future biorefineries. Waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors (e.g., food industry, pulp and paper industry, biodiesel and bioethanol production) could be used as renewable resources for both biorefinery development and production of nutrient-complete fermentation feedstocks. This review focuses on the potential of utilizing waste and by-product streams from current industrial activities for the production of chemicals and biopolymers via microbial bioconversion. The first part of this review presents the current status and prospects on fermentative production of important platform chemicals (i.e., selected C2–C6 metabolic products and single cell oil) and biopolymers (i.e., polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacterial cellulose). In the second part, the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors are presented. In the third part, the techno-economic aspects of bioconversion processes are critically reviewed. Four case studies showing the potential of case-specific waste and by-product streams for the production of succinic acid and polyhydroxyalkanoates are presented. It is evident that fermentative production of chemicals and biopolymers via refining of waste and by-product streams is a highly important research area with significant prospects for industrial applications.

AB - The transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to a bio-based economy necessitates the exploitation of synergies, scientific innovations and breakthroughs, and step changes in the infrastructure of chemical industry. Sustainable production of chemicals and biopolymers should be dependent entirely on renewable carbon. White biotechnology could provide the necessary tools for the evolution of microbial bioconversion into a key unit operation in future biorefineries. Waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors (e.g., food industry, pulp and paper industry, biodiesel and bioethanol production) could be used as renewable resources for both biorefinery development and production of nutrient-complete fermentation feedstocks. This review focuses on the potential of utilizing waste and by-product streams from current industrial activities for the production of chemicals and biopolymers via microbial bioconversion. The first part of this review presents the current status and prospects on fermentative production of important platform chemicals (i.e., selected C2–C6 metabolic products and single cell oil) and biopolymers (i.e., polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacterial cellulose). In the second part, the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors are presented. In the third part, the techno-economic aspects of bioconversion processes are critically reviewed. Four case studies showing the potential of case-specific waste and by-product streams for the production of succinic acid and polyhydroxyalkanoates are presented. It is evident that fermentative production of chemicals and biopolymers via refining of waste and by-product streams is a highly important research area with significant prospects for industrial applications.

KW - Chemistry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896926470&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c3cs60293a

DO - 10.1039/c3cs60293a

M3 - Scientific review articles

C2 - 24424298

VL - 43

SP - 2587

EP - 2627

JO - Chemical Society Reviews

JF - Chemical Society Reviews

SN - 0306-0012

IS - 8

ER -

DOI