Are all errors created equal? Testing the effect of error characteristics on learning from errors in three countries

Publikation: Beiträge in ZeitschriftenZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungbegutachtet

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Are all errors created equal? Testing the effect of error characteristics on learning from errors in three countries. / Horvath, Dorothee; Klamar, Alexander; Keith, Nina; Frese, Michael.

in: The European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, Jahrgang 30, Nr. 1, 02.01.2021, S. 110-124.

Publikation: Beiträge in ZeitschriftenZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungbegutachtet

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@article{c516e7867d4a42ddbf4c6d2861c423b7,
title = "Are all errors created equal?: Testing the effect of error characteristics on learning from errors in three countries",
abstract = "Errors can be a source of learning. However, little is known to what extent learning from errors depends on error characteristics and the context in which the error was made. We tested the assumption that more learning occurs from errors with severe consequences and when the error was made by oneself. We further investigated if and how learning from errors and organizational error culture differs between countries. In two vignette studies (Study 1, N = 118 from the United States; Study 2, N = 588 from the United States, Hungary, and Germany), participants responded to error scenarios that happened to employees at work. As expected, people learned more from errors in terms of affective error learning (Studies 1 and 2) and cognitive error learning (Study 1) if consequences were severe and if the error was made by themselves. Furthermore, we found differences between countries (Study 2) in that participants from the United States learned more from errors and reported more error management culture than participants from Hungary or Germany. Furthermore, the relationship of country and learning was mediated by error management culture. With our studies, we aim to contribute to a better exploitation of the learning potential inherent in errors.",
keywords = "Business psychology, Errors, learning from errors, country differences, error management, Management studies",
author = "Dorothee Horvath and Alexander Klamar and Nina Keith and Michael Frese",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/1359432X.2020.1839420",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "110--124",
journal = "The European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology",
issn = "1359-432X",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are all errors created equal?

T2 - Testing the effect of error characteristics on learning from errors in three countries

AU - Horvath, Dorothee

AU - Klamar, Alexander

AU - Keith, Nina

AU - Frese, Michael

PY - 2021/1/2

Y1 - 2021/1/2

N2 - Errors can be a source of learning. However, little is known to what extent learning from errors depends on error characteristics and the context in which the error was made. We tested the assumption that more learning occurs from errors with severe consequences and when the error was made by oneself. We further investigated if and how learning from errors and organizational error culture differs between countries. In two vignette studies (Study 1, N = 118 from the United States; Study 2, N = 588 from the United States, Hungary, and Germany), participants responded to error scenarios that happened to employees at work. As expected, people learned more from errors in terms of affective error learning (Studies 1 and 2) and cognitive error learning (Study 1) if consequences were severe and if the error was made by themselves. Furthermore, we found differences between countries (Study 2) in that participants from the United States learned more from errors and reported more error management culture than participants from Hungary or Germany. Furthermore, the relationship of country and learning was mediated by error management culture. With our studies, we aim to contribute to a better exploitation of the learning potential inherent in errors.

AB - Errors can be a source of learning. However, little is known to what extent learning from errors depends on error characteristics and the context in which the error was made. We tested the assumption that more learning occurs from errors with severe consequences and when the error was made by oneself. We further investigated if and how learning from errors and organizational error culture differs between countries. In two vignette studies (Study 1, N = 118 from the United States; Study 2, N = 588 from the United States, Hungary, and Germany), participants responded to error scenarios that happened to employees at work. As expected, people learned more from errors in terms of affective error learning (Studies 1 and 2) and cognitive error learning (Study 1) if consequences were severe and if the error was made by themselves. Furthermore, we found differences between countries (Study 2) in that participants from the United States learned more from errors and reported more error management culture than participants from Hungary or Germany. Furthermore, the relationship of country and learning was mediated by error management culture. With our studies, we aim to contribute to a better exploitation of the learning potential inherent in errors.

KW - Business psychology

KW - Errors

KW - learning from errors

KW - country differences

KW - error management

KW - Management studies

U2 - 10.1080/1359432X.2020.1839420

DO - 10.1080/1359432X.2020.1839420

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 30

SP - 110

EP - 124

JO - The European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

JF - The European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology

SN - 1359-432X

IS - 1

ER -

DOI