Teachers' Emotion Regulation Skills Facilitate Implementation of Health-related Intentions

Publikation: Beiträge in ZeitschriftenZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschung

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Teachers' Emotion Regulation Skills Facilitate Implementation of Health-related Intentions. / Eckert, Marcus; Ebert, David D; Lehr, Dirk; Sieland, Bernhard; Jazaieri, Hooria; Berking, Matthias.

in: American Journal of Health Behavior, Jahrgang 39, Nr. 6, 01.11.2015, S. 874-881.

Publikation: Beiträge in ZeitschriftenZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschung

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@article{49a4e6f8c95d4be39e4ece412511aaba,
title = "Teachers' Emotion Regulation Skills Facilitate Implementation of Health-related Intentions",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Many teachers report high levels of job-related stress. Successful outcomes in stress-management trainings depend on participants actively engaging in skill-building exercises. However, despite good intentions to engage in such exercises on a regular basis, many participants ultimately fail to do so. The present study seeks to understand whether general emotion regulation (ER) skills moderate the relation between the intention to engage in skill-building exercises and actually engaging in these exercises.METHODS: ER skills, the intention to engage in autonomous skill-building exercises, and the extent to which individuals actually engaged in such exercises were assessed in a sample of 119 teachers participating in stress-management training.RESULTS: ER skills significantly moderated the association between the intention and engagement in skill-building practice. The greater the ER skills, the more coupled was the relation between the intention and actual practices.CONCLUSION: Findings are consistent with the hypotheses. Thus, skill-building trainings should support participants scoring low in ER skills in effectively coping with aversive affective states cued through skill-building exercises.",
keywords = "Health sciences, stress-management training, health-behavior, intention-behavior-gap, emotion regulation, adaptively cope with stress, engaging in health-related intention",
author = "Marcus Eckert and Ebert, {David D} and Dirk Lehr and Bernhard Sieland and Hooria Jazaieri and Matthias Berking",
year = "2015",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.5993/AJHB.39.6.15",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "874--881",
journal = "American Journal of Health Behavior",
issn = "1087-3244",
publisher = "PNG Publications",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teachers' Emotion Regulation Skills Facilitate Implementation of Health-related Intentions

AU - Eckert, Marcus

AU - Ebert, David D

AU - Lehr, Dirk

AU - Sieland, Bernhard

AU - Jazaieri, Hooria

AU - Berking, Matthias

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Many teachers report high levels of job-related stress. Successful outcomes in stress-management trainings depend on participants actively engaging in skill-building exercises. However, despite good intentions to engage in such exercises on a regular basis, many participants ultimately fail to do so. The present study seeks to understand whether general emotion regulation (ER) skills moderate the relation between the intention to engage in skill-building exercises and actually engaging in these exercises.METHODS: ER skills, the intention to engage in autonomous skill-building exercises, and the extent to which individuals actually engaged in such exercises were assessed in a sample of 119 teachers participating in stress-management training.RESULTS: ER skills significantly moderated the association between the intention and engagement in skill-building practice. The greater the ER skills, the more coupled was the relation between the intention and actual practices.CONCLUSION: Findings are consistent with the hypotheses. Thus, skill-building trainings should support participants scoring low in ER skills in effectively coping with aversive affective states cued through skill-building exercises.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Many teachers report high levels of job-related stress. Successful outcomes in stress-management trainings depend on participants actively engaging in skill-building exercises. However, despite good intentions to engage in such exercises on a regular basis, many participants ultimately fail to do so. The present study seeks to understand whether general emotion regulation (ER) skills moderate the relation between the intention to engage in skill-building exercises and actually engaging in these exercises.METHODS: ER skills, the intention to engage in autonomous skill-building exercises, and the extent to which individuals actually engaged in such exercises were assessed in a sample of 119 teachers participating in stress-management training.RESULTS: ER skills significantly moderated the association between the intention and engagement in skill-building practice. The greater the ER skills, the more coupled was the relation between the intention and actual practices.CONCLUSION: Findings are consistent with the hypotheses. Thus, skill-building trainings should support participants scoring low in ER skills in effectively coping with aversive affective states cued through skill-building exercises.

KW - Health sciences

KW - stress-management training

KW - health-behavior

KW - intention-behavior-gap

KW - emotion regulation

KW - adaptively cope with stress

KW - engaging in health-related intention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943600999&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5993/AJHB.39.6.15

DO - 10.5993/AJHB.39.6.15

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 26450555

VL - 39

SP - 874

EP - 881

JO - American Journal of Health Behavior

JF - American Journal of Health Behavior

SN - 1087-3244

IS - 6

ER -

DOI