Pesticide and Greenhouse Gas Externalities from US Agriculture: The Impact of their Internalization and Climate Change

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Pesticide and Greenhouse Gas Externalities from US Agriculture : The Impact of their Internalization and Climate Change. / Shakhramanyan, Dr. Nikolinka G.; Schneider, Uwe A.; McCarl, Bruce A.

In: Climate Change Economics, Vol. 4, No. 3, 1350008 , 01.08.2013.

Research output: Journal contributionsJournal articlesResearchpeer-review

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@article{7036fcc2a21348b5ab7dcb9ad504c986,
title = "Pesticide and Greenhouse Gas Externalities from US Agriculture: The Impact of their Internalization and Climate Change",
abstract = "Climate change may affect the use of pesticides and their associated environmental and human health impacts. This study employs and modifies a partial equilibrium model of the US agricultural sector to examine the effects of alternative regulations of the pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externality. Simulation results indicate that without pesticide externality regulations and low greenhouse gas emission mitigation strategy, climate change benefits from increased agricultural production in the US are more than offset by increased environmental costs. Although the combined regulation of pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externalities increases farmers' production costs, their net income effects are positive because of price adjustments and associated welfare shifts from consumers to producers. The results also show heterogeneous impacts on preferred pest management intensities across major crops. While pesticide externality regulations lead to substantial increases in total water use, climate policies induce the opposite effect.",
keywords = "Sustainability sciences, Management & Economics, Climate change impacts, pesticide externality, farm management adaptation, agricultural sector model, welfare maximization, environmental policy analysis, water resource, mathematical programming, Climate change impacts; pesticide externality; farm management adaptation; agricultural sector model; welfare maximization; environmental policy analysis; water resource; mathematical programming ",
author = "Shakhramanyan, {Dr. Nikolinka G.} and Schneider, {Uwe A.} and McCarl, {Bruce A.}",
year = "2013",
month = aug,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1142/S2010007813500085",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
journal = "Climate Change Economics",
issn = "2010-0078",
publisher = "World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pesticide and Greenhouse Gas Externalities from US Agriculture

T2 - The Impact of their Internalization and Climate Change

AU - Shakhramanyan, Dr. Nikolinka G.

AU - Schneider, Uwe A.

AU - McCarl, Bruce A.

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - Climate change may affect the use of pesticides and their associated environmental and human health impacts. This study employs and modifies a partial equilibrium model of the US agricultural sector to examine the effects of alternative regulations of the pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externality. Simulation results indicate that without pesticide externality regulations and low greenhouse gas emission mitigation strategy, climate change benefits from increased agricultural production in the US are more than offset by increased environmental costs. Although the combined regulation of pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externalities increases farmers' production costs, their net income effects are positive because of price adjustments and associated welfare shifts from consumers to producers. The results also show heterogeneous impacts on preferred pest management intensities across major crops. While pesticide externality regulations lead to substantial increases in total water use, climate policies induce the opposite effect.

AB - Climate change may affect the use of pesticides and their associated environmental and human health impacts. This study employs and modifies a partial equilibrium model of the US agricultural sector to examine the effects of alternative regulations of the pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externality. Simulation results indicate that without pesticide externality regulations and low greenhouse gas emission mitigation strategy, climate change benefits from increased agricultural production in the US are more than offset by increased environmental costs. Although the combined regulation of pesticide and greenhouse gas emission externalities increases farmers' production costs, their net income effects are positive because of price adjustments and associated welfare shifts from consumers to producers. The results also show heterogeneous impacts on preferred pest management intensities across major crops. While pesticide externality regulations lead to substantial increases in total water use, climate policies induce the opposite effect.

KW - Sustainability sciences, Management & Economics

KW - Climate change impacts

KW - pesticide externality

KW - farm management adaptation

KW - agricultural sector model

KW - welfare maximization

KW - environmental policy analysis

KW - water resource

KW - mathematical programming

KW - Climate change impacts; pesticide externality; farm management adaptation; agricultural sector model; welfare maximization; environmental policy analysis; water resource; mathematical programming

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015488440&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1142/S2010007813500085

DO - 10.1142/S2010007813500085

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 4

JO - Climate Change Economics

JF - Climate Change Economics

SN - 2010-0078

IS - 3

M1 - 1350008

ER -