Born to Be an Entrepreneur ? Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship

Publikation: Beiträge in SammelwerkenKapitelbegutachtet

Standard

Born to Be an Entrepreneur ? Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship. / Rauch, Andreas; Frese, Michael.

The Psychology of Entrepreneurship . Hrsg. / J. R. Baum; M. Frese; R. A. Baron . 1. Aufl. Mahwah : Erlbaum Publishers, 2007. S. 41-65 (The organizational frontiers series).

Publikation: Beiträge in SammelwerkenKapitelbegutachtet

Harvard

Rauch, A & Frese, M 2007, Born to Be an Entrepreneur ? Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship. in JR Baum, M Frese & RA Baron (Hrsg.), The Psychology of Entrepreneurship . 1. Aufl., The organizational frontiers series, Erlbaum Publishers, Mahwah, S. 41-65. <https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781315750989-11>

APA

Rauch, A., & Frese, M. (2007). Born to Be an Entrepreneur ? Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship. in J. R. Baum, M. Frese, & R. A. Baron (Hrsg.), The Psychology of Entrepreneurship (1. Aufl., S. 41-65). (The organizational frontiers series). Erlbaum Publishers. https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/edit/10.4324/9781315750989-11

Vancouver

Rauch A, Frese M. Born to Be an Entrepreneur ? Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship. in Baum JR, Frese M, Baron RA, Hrsg., The Psychology of Entrepreneurship . 1. Aufl. Mahwah: Erlbaum Publishers. 2007. S. 41-65. (The organizational frontiers series).

Bibtex

@inbook{22a5370f1d1d40f4a6d6086c34fd59b0,
title = "Born to Be an Entrepreneur ?: Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship",
abstract = "The personality approach is one of the classical and early approaches to entrepreneurship. At the same time, it is one of the more controversial areas of research. The personality approach to entrepreneurship has been criticized in the entrepreneurship literature with the following arguments (Aldrich & Wiedenmayer, 1993; Brockhaus & Horwitz, 1985; Gartner, 1989; Low & MacMillan, 1988): Entrepreneurship requires too varied behaviors to be related to specific personality traits; personality traits are not strongly enough related to entrepreneurship to warrant further studies; and alternative views, such as ecological approaches, have been proposed that concentrate on environmental accounts. These arguments were quite effective and led to the dominant position in entrepreneurship research that works on personality traits should be discontinued (Low & MacMillan, 1988). Asimilar position seemed to exist for a while in organizational behavior and industrial/organizational psychology, as well: Here similar arguments on the lack of usefulness of personality prediction of performance (and leadership) were voiced (Guion & Gottier, 1965). Much of this started out with the book by Mischel (1968) arguing that results on personality constructs were limited by r = .30 to explain meaningful behaviors and that there was lack of cross-situational consistency in personality variables. However, over time, the tide changed and there is now a revival of personality research in performance and leadership research and in many other areas of industrial/organizational psychology too. There is now the consensus that there is ample evidence for the validity of certain personality variables for organization behavior (Barrick & Mount, 1991) and for leadership (Judge, Bono, Ilies, & Gerhardt, 2002).",
keywords = "Business psychology, Entrepreneurship",
author = "Andreas Rauch and Michael Frese",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
isbn = "0-8058-5062-7",
series = "The organizational frontiers series",
publisher = "Erlbaum Publishers",
pages = "41--65",
editor = "Baum, {J. R. } and M. Frese and {Baron }, {R. A. }",
booktitle = "The Psychology of Entrepreneurship",
edition = "1.",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Born to Be an Entrepreneur ?

T2 - Revisiting the Personality Approach to Entrepreneurship

AU - Rauch, Andreas

AU - Frese, Michael

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The personality approach is one of the classical and early approaches to entrepreneurship. At the same time, it is one of the more controversial areas of research. The personality approach to entrepreneurship has been criticized in the entrepreneurship literature with the following arguments (Aldrich & Wiedenmayer, 1993; Brockhaus & Horwitz, 1985; Gartner, 1989; Low & MacMillan, 1988): Entrepreneurship requires too varied behaviors to be related to specific personality traits; personality traits are not strongly enough related to entrepreneurship to warrant further studies; and alternative views, such as ecological approaches, have been proposed that concentrate on environmental accounts. These arguments were quite effective and led to the dominant position in entrepreneurship research that works on personality traits should be discontinued (Low & MacMillan, 1988). Asimilar position seemed to exist for a while in organizational behavior and industrial/organizational psychology, as well: Here similar arguments on the lack of usefulness of personality prediction of performance (and leadership) were voiced (Guion & Gottier, 1965). Much of this started out with the book by Mischel (1968) arguing that results on personality constructs were limited by r = .30 to explain meaningful behaviors and that there was lack of cross-situational consistency in personality variables. However, over time, the tide changed and there is now a revival of personality research in performance and leadership research and in many other areas of industrial/organizational psychology too. There is now the consensus that there is ample evidence for the validity of certain personality variables for organization behavior (Barrick & Mount, 1991) and for leadership (Judge, Bono, Ilies, & Gerhardt, 2002).

AB - The personality approach is one of the classical and early approaches to entrepreneurship. At the same time, it is one of the more controversial areas of research. The personality approach to entrepreneurship has been criticized in the entrepreneurship literature with the following arguments (Aldrich & Wiedenmayer, 1993; Brockhaus & Horwitz, 1985; Gartner, 1989; Low & MacMillan, 1988): Entrepreneurship requires too varied behaviors to be related to specific personality traits; personality traits are not strongly enough related to entrepreneurship to warrant further studies; and alternative views, such as ecological approaches, have been proposed that concentrate on environmental accounts. These arguments were quite effective and led to the dominant position in entrepreneurship research that works on personality traits should be discontinued (Low & MacMillan, 1988). Asimilar position seemed to exist for a while in organizational behavior and industrial/organizational psychology, as well: Here similar arguments on the lack of usefulness of personality prediction of performance (and leadership) were voiced (Guion & Gottier, 1965). Much of this started out with the book by Mischel (1968) arguing that results on personality constructs were limited by r = .30 to explain meaningful behaviors and that there was lack of cross-situational consistency in personality variables. However, over time, the tide changed and there is now a revival of personality research in performance and leadership research and in many other areas of industrial/organizational psychology too. There is now the consensus that there is ample evidence for the validity of certain personality variables for organization behavior (Barrick & Mount, 1991) and for leadership (Judge, Bono, Ilies, & Gerhardt, 2002).

KW - Business psychology

KW - Entrepreneurship

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85120447008&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

SN - 0-8058-5062-7

SN - 9780805850628

T3 - The organizational frontiers series

SP - 41

EP - 65

BT - The Psychology of Entrepreneurship

A2 - Baum, J. R.

A2 - Frese, M.

A2 - Baron , R. A.

PB - Erlbaum Publishers

CY - Mahwah

ER -